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TV SCHEDULE
KCTS 9 PBS KIDS 24/7 Live Stream
Friday, January 18
Jan 18, 3:00pm NOVA
Day the Dinosaurs Died (55 min)

66 million years ago, a seven-mile-wide asteroid collided with Earth, triggering a chain of events that coincide with the end of the dinosaurs. But experts have long debated exactly what happened when the asteroid struck and how the giant beasts met their end. Now, scientists have uncovered compelling new clues about the catastrophe.

DVI Availability:
Sunday, January 20
Jan 20, 11:00am NOVA
Day the Dinosaurs Died (55 min)

66 million years ago, a seven-mile-wide asteroid collided with Earth, triggering a chain of events that coincide with the end of the dinosaurs. But experts have long debated exactly what happened when the asteroid struck and how the giant beasts met their end. Now, scientists have uncovered compelling new clues about the catastrophe.

DVI Availability:
Thursday, January 24
Jan 23, 9:00pm NOVA
Island Volcano (56 min)

Join scientists and residents on a breathtaking journey to investigate the Kilauea volcano's recent spike in activity, including the deadly April 2017 eruption. Along the way, some of Hawaii's biggest secrets are revealed.

DVI Availability:
2
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Friday, January 25
Jan 25, 3:00pm NOVA
Island Volcano (56 min)

Join scientists and residents on a breathtaking journey to investigate the Kilauea volcano's recent spike in activity, including the deadly April 2017 eruption. Along the way, some of Hawaii's biggest secrets are revealed.

DVI Availability:
2
Sunday, January 27
Jan 27, 11:00am NOVA
Island Volcano (56 min)

Join scientists and residents on a breathtaking journey to investigate the Kilauea volcano's recent spike in activity, including the deadly April 2017 eruption. Along the way, some of Hawaii's biggest secrets are revealed.

DVI Availability:
2
Thursday, January 31
Jan 30, 9:00pm NOVA
First Face of America (56 min)

One unlucky day 13,000 years ago, a slight, malnourished teenager missed her footing and tumbled to the bottom of a 100-foot pit deep inside a cave in Mexico’s Yucatán. Rising seas flooded the cave and cut it off from the outside world—until a team of divers chanced upon her nearly complete skeleton in 2007.

DVI Availability:
Friday, February 1
Feb 1, 3:00pm NOVA
First Face of America (55 min)

One unlucky day 13,000 years ago, a slight, malnourished teenager missed her footing and tumbled to the bottom of a 100-foot pit deep inside a cave in Mexico’s Yucatán. Rising seas flooded the cave and cut it off from the outside world—until a team of divers chanced upon her nearly complete skeleton in 2007.

DVI Availability:
Sunday, February 3
Feb 3, 11:00am NOVA
First Face of America (55 min)

One unlucky day 13,000 years ago, a slight, malnourished teenager missed her footing and tumbled to the bottom of a 100-foot pit deep inside a cave in Mexico’s Yucatán. Rising seas flooded the cave and cut it off from the outside world—until a team of divers chanced upon her nearly complete skeleton in 2007.

DVI Availability:
Thursday, February 7
Feb 6, 9:00pm NOVA
Decoding The Pyramids (56 min)

How did the ancient Egyptians build the pyramids of Giza with only copper hand tools and none of today's construction and surveying equipment? Who were the thousands of laborers who raised the stones? Were they slaves or volunteers, and how were they housed, fed, and organized? Decoding the Pyramids presents the latest evidence from the groundbreaking research of archaeologists Mark Lehner and Zahi Hawass, who over more than two decades have transformed our understanding of the ancient world's most ambitious engineering project. Now, their teams return to Giza to for a first-time dig into the remains of the barracks housing the laborers who toiled on the Great Pyramid-an investigation likely to yield crucial clues to their identity, diet, and status. Reporting on an even more exciting discovery, the show meets French archaeologist Pierre Tallet, whose team found the world's oldest writing on papyrus. Amazingly, this 4, 500-year-old record proved to be the logbook of a labor team leader who was in charge of delivering limestone blocks to build the Great Pyramid. His logbook mentions the barracks and port facilities identified by Lehner's fieldwork at Giza, as well as naming the man who was in charge of the Great Pyramid building operation. Could a new papyrus discovery disclose more stunning clues to Giza's long-buried secrets?

DVI Availability:
2
Friday, February 8
Feb 8, 3:00pm NOVA
Decoding The Pyramids (56 min)

How did the ancient Egyptians build the pyramids of Giza with only copper hand tools and none of today's construction and surveying equipment? Who were the thousands of laborers who raised the stones? Were they slaves or volunteers, and how were they housed, fed, and organized? Decoding the Pyramids presents the latest evidence from the groundbreaking research of archaeologists Mark Lehner and Zahi Hawass, who over more than two decades have transformed our understanding of the ancient world's most ambitious engineering project. Now, their teams return to Giza to for a first-time dig into the remains of the barracks housing the laborers who toiled on the Great Pyramid-an investigation likely to yield crucial clues to their identity, diet, and status. Reporting on an even more exciting discovery, the show meets French archaeologist Pierre Tallet, whose team found the world's oldest writing on papyrus. Amazingly, this 4, 500-year-old record proved to be the logbook of a labor team leader who was in charge of delivering limestone blocks to build the Great Pyramid. His logbook mentions the barracks and port facilities identified by Lehner's fieldwork at Giza, as well as naming the man who was in charge of the Great Pyramid building operation. Could a new papyrus discovery disclose more stunning clues to Giza's long-buried secrets?

DVI Availability:
2
Sunday, February 10
Feb 10, 11:00am NOVA
Decoding The Pyramids (56 min)

How did the ancient Egyptians build the pyramids of Giza with only copper hand tools and none of today's construction and surveying equipment? Who were the thousands of laborers who raised the stones? Were they slaves or volunteers, and how were they housed, fed, and organized? Decoding the Pyramids presents the latest evidence from the groundbreaking research of archaeologists Mark Lehner and Zahi Hawass, who over more than two decades have transformed our understanding of the ancient world's most ambitious engineering project. Now, their teams return to Giza to for a first-time dig into the remains of the barracks housing the laborers who toiled on the Great Pyramid-an investigation likely to yield crucial clues to their identity, diet, and status. Reporting on an even more exciting discovery, the show meets French archaeologist Pierre Tallet, whose team found the world's oldest writing on papyrus. Amazingly, this 4, 500-year-old record proved to be the logbook of a labor team leader who was in charge of delivering limestone blocks to build the Great Pyramid. His logbook mentions the barracks and port facilities identified by Lehner's fieldwork at Giza, as well as naming the man who was in charge of the Great Pyramid building operation. Could a new papyrus discovery disclose more stunning clues to Giza's long-buried secrets?

DVI Availability:
2
Thursday, February 14
Feb 13, 9:00pm NOVA
Rise of the Rockets (56 min)

We may be witnessing the dawn of a bold new era of human activity in space-for science and exploration-but also for profit. An explosion of private companies are developing new technologies and lowering costs to bring space closer than ever. And at the same time, NASA is returning to manned spaceflight with gusto-once again building a rocket to take us far beyond Earth-a rocket more powerful even than the storied Saturn V. But this is not the first time we've seen signs of a rocketry renaissance. In the 1980s, there was a boom-and bust-in the privatization of space travel. Will today's optimism over companies like SpaceX and Virgin Galactic prove prescient or will we once again falter and lose our nerve? One thing is certain: as costs come down and new rockets with new capabilities come online a new generation is reaching for the cosmos; once more daring to dream big, yearning to go further, and in greater numbers than ever before.

DVI Availability:
2
Friday, February 15
Feb 15, 3:00pm NOVA
Rise of the Rockets (56 min)

We may be witnessing the dawn of a bold new era of human activity in space-for science and exploration-but also for profit. An explosion of private companies are developing new technologies and lowering costs to bring space closer than ever. And at the same time, NASA is returning to manned spaceflight with gusto-once again building a rocket to take us far beyond Earth-a rocket more powerful even than the storied Saturn V. But this is not the first time we've seen signs of a rocketry renaissance. In the 1980s, there was a boom-and bust-in the privatization of space travel. Will today's optimism over companies like SpaceX and Virgin Galactic prove prescient or will we once again falter and lose our nerve? One thing is certain: as costs come down and new rockets with new capabilities come online a new generation is reaching for the cosmos; once more daring to dream big, yearning to go further, and in greater numbers than ever before.

DVI Availability:
2
Sunday, February 17
Feb 17, 11:00am NOVA
Rise of the Rockets (56 min)

We may be witnessing the dawn of a bold new era of human activity in space-for science and exploration-but also for profit. An explosion of private companies are developing new technologies and lowering costs to bring space closer than ever. And at the same time, NASA is returning to manned spaceflight with gusto-once again building a rocket to take us far beyond Earth-a rocket more powerful even than the storied Saturn V. But this is not the first time we've seen signs of a rocketry renaissance. In the 1980s, there was a boom-and bust-in the privatization of space travel. Will today's optimism over companies like SpaceX and Virgin Galactic prove prescient or will we once again falter and lose our nerve? One thing is certain: as costs come down and new rockets with new capabilities come online a new generation is reaching for the cosmos; once more daring to dream big, yearning to go further, and in greater numbers than ever before.

DVI Availability:
2
Thursday, February 21
Feb 20, 9:00pm NOVA
Pompeii (56 min)

Could a massive volcanic eruption devastate a major Italian city? The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is the ancient world's most celebrated and haunting catastrophe. Within hours of its awakening on in AD 79, deadly clouds of burning ash and gas swept down through the bustling Roman city of Pompeii, burying thousands. But few of today's inhabitants of nearby Naples realize the existence of another volcano right under their feet. In fact, the city's suburbs and outlying towns are home to over half a million people, who live inside the giant collapsed crater of an ancient supervolcano. Its last major eruption killed 6,000 people in 1631. Now, a team of geologists has found evidence that a huge volume of magma is stirring beneath the surface of the crater and could break through the crust in the near future, triggering an explosive eruption that could kill tens of thousands. In The Next Pompeii, NOVA joins the London team as they hunt for clues hidden beneath the surface and assess the risk of a new and potentially devastating eruption. The show also follows historians and geologists as they discover the latest evidence of Pompeii's fiery destruction, unpacking the chain of events that led to the ancient world's most notorious disaster. What lessons does the tragedy of Pompeii hold for Naples' citizens, who face a mounting threat from the unseen forces beneath their feet?

DVI Availability:
2
Friday, February 22
Feb 22, 3:00pm NOVA
Pompeii (56 min)

Could a massive volcanic eruption devastate a major Italian city? The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is the ancient world's most celebrated and haunting catastrophe. Within hours of its awakening on in AD 79, deadly clouds of burning ash and gas swept down through the bustling Roman city of Pompeii, burying thousands. But few of today's inhabitants of nearby Naples realize the existence of another volcano right under their feet. In fact, the city's suburbs and outlying towns are home to over half a million people, who live inside the giant collapsed crater of an ancient supervolcano. Its last major eruption killed 6,000 people in 1631. Now, a team of geologists has found evidence that a huge volume of magma is stirring beneath the surface of the crater and could break through the crust in the near future, triggering an explosive eruption that could kill tens of thousands. In The Next Pompeii, NOVA joins the London team as they hunt for clues hidden beneath the surface and assess the risk of a new and potentially devastating eruption. The show also follows historians and geologists as they discover the latest evidence of Pompeii's fiery destruction, unpacking the chain of events that led to the ancient world's most notorious disaster. What lessons does the tragedy of Pompeii hold for Naples' citizens, who face a mounting threat from the unseen forces beneath their feet?

DVI Availability:
2
Sunday, February 24
Feb 24, 11:00am NOVA
Pompeii (56 min)

Could a massive volcanic eruption devastate a major Italian city? The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is the ancient world's most celebrated and haunting catastrophe. Within hours of its awakening on in AD 79, deadly clouds of burning ash and gas swept down through the bustling Roman city of Pompeii, burying thousands. But few of today's inhabitants of nearby Naples realize the existence of another volcano right under their feet. In fact, the city's suburbs and outlying towns are home to over half a million people, who live inside the giant collapsed crater of an ancient supervolcano. Its last major eruption killed 6,000 people in 1631. Now, a team of geologists has found evidence that a huge volume of magma is stirring beneath the surface of the crater and could break through the crust in the near future, triggering an explosive eruption that could kill tens of thousands. In The Next Pompeii, NOVA joins the London team as they hunt for clues hidden beneath the surface and assess the risk of a new and potentially devastating eruption. The show also follows historians and geologists as they discover the latest evidence of Pompeii's fiery destruction, unpacking the chain of events that led to the ancient world's most notorious disaster. What lessons does the tragedy of Pompeii hold for Naples' citizens, who face a mounting threat from the unseen forces beneath their feet?

DVI Availability:
2
Thursday, February 28
Feb 27, 9:00pm NOVA
Great Human Odyssey (1 hour 56 min)

Our ancient human ancestors once lived only in Africa in tiny bands of a few thousand hunter-gatherers. Then we moved out of our African cradle, spreading rapidly to every corner of the planet. How did we acquire the skills, technology and talent to thrive in every environment on earth? How did our prehistoric forebears cross the Sahara, survive frigid ice ages, and sail to remote Pacific islands?

DVI Availability: