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Local Resources: Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Sex Trafficking

October 19, 2017

The definitions and resources below are courtesy of the Coalition Ending Gender-Based Violence, and their member programs. The Coalition is a King County-wide network of more than 40 member programs, whose mission is to create safe and just communities where all people can thrive. 

About domestic violence

An estimated one-third of King County residents will experience some form of domestic violence in their lifetimes — and no one is immune to its far-reaching impact. Domestic violence is a pattern of intimidating and coercive behaviors that a person uses to gain and maintain power and control over an intimate partner. You may also have heard it referred to as intimate partner violence or battering. People who are abusive often cause a great deal of physical, emotional, mental, and financial harm to their partners, children, other family members, and to the community as a whole.

Some of the more common forms of domestic violence include:

  • Physical abuse (hitting, pushing, restraining, destroying things, stopping you from leaving)
  • Sexual abuse (unwanted touching, restricting birth control, sexual humiliation, forced sexual acts)
  • Emotional abuse (withholding affection, put-downs, name-calling, intimidation and threats)
  • Psychological abuse (isolation from family and friends, questioning your sanity, stalking, threats of suicide or murder, abusing pets)
  • Economic abuse (controlling your money, not allowing you to work, getting you fired)

About sexual assault

It is estimated that every two minutes, someone in the United States is sexually assaulted. Sexual assault includes a wide range of sexual behavior or contact that occurs without the clear consent of the recipient. It occurs when a person is forced, coerced, and/or manipulated into unwanted sexual activity. Most sexual abusers or attackers are someone the victim knows and can include intimate partners or family members. Sexual assault is a profound violation of a person’s body, sexuality, sense of self, and right to feel safe.

Behaviors that are defined as sexual assault include:

  • Forced sexual acts
  • Rape or attempted rape
  • Child molestation, incest, and/or fondling
  • Coercing sex by using threats to a victim’s social, economic, health, legal, or immigration status
  • Having sexual relations with a person who is unable to consent (i.e., they are impaired, under age of consent, or incapacitated due to a physical, mental or emotional condition)
  • Abusing one’s authority or perceived power to achieve sexual gratification (as in therapist/patient, priest/parishioner, employer/employee, teacher/student)

About human trafficking

The National Human Trafficking Resource Center has received reports of over 14,500 sex trafficking cases inside the United States since 2007. This global problem is a form of slavery, and although you may not be aware of it, it does takes place within our community. Trafficked adults include people who are recruited or obtained for commercial sex by force, fraud, or coercion. Any child who is recruited or obtained for commercial sex is by definition trafficked, regardless of how they got involved. An individual can be involved in a trafficking situation from days to years, and they may be moved from place to place. It is important to note that sex trafficking often intersects with labor trafficking. Many people who are trafficked for their labor are also sexually assaulted, abused, and/or forced into prostitution.

Populations especially vulnerable to sex trafficking in the U.S. include runaway and homeless youth, people who have experienced domestic violence and/or sexual assault, refugees from war-torn countries, people exploited on the basis of their immigration status, and people who are subject to discrimination on the basis of race, sexual orientation, and/or gender identity.

There are many ways that people can be trafficked, including:

  • Being manipulated or forced into prostitution by an intimate partner
  • Being forced by family members or relatives into selling sex
  • Having someone lure you into a trafficking situation by falsely promising you a job (such as dancing or modeling)
  • Being coerced into sex by violence, threats, lies, and economic bondage (such as saying you can’t leave until you pay back a debt)

Hotlines

Washington State Domestic Violence Hotline800-562-6025
National Domestic Violence Hotline800-799-7233
National Deaf Domestic Violence Hotline855-812-1001 (video phone)
Peace in the Home Helpline
(support in 17 languages, King County)
888-847-7205
King County Sexual Assault Resource Center Hotline888-998-6423
Harborview Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress206-744-1600
YouthCare800-495-7802

Domestic Violence Services

Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services

206-812-1001                 
API Chaya (Serving Asian, South Asian, and Pacific Islander Survivors) 206-467-9976
Broadview Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing Program (Seattle)206-299-2500
Consejo Counseling and Referrals Service
(Serving Latino/a Survivors)
206-461-4880
Domestic Abuse Women’s Network
(24 hours, South King County)
425-656-7867
DoVE Project (Vashon Island)206-462-0911
Jennifer Beach Foundation253-833-5366
Jewish Family Service Project DVORA 206-461-3240
LifeWire, formerly EDVP
(24 hours, East King County)
800-827-8840
New Beginnings
(24 hours, Seattle)
206-522-9472
Northwest Family Life (Christian faith-based)206-363-9601
NW Network for Bisexual, Trans & Lesbian Survivors of Abuse206-568-7777
Refugee Women’s Alliance Domestic Violence Program 206-721-3846
Salvation Army Domestic Violence Program
(24 hours, Seattle)
206-324-4943
Seattle Counseling Services 206-323-0220
Seattle Indian Health Board Domestic Violence Program 206-324-9360
YWCA – East Cherry
(Services for African American survivors)
206-568-7845
YWCA Downtown Seattle Shelter 206-461-4882
YWCA – South King County Domestic Violence Services425-226-1266

Sexual Assault Services

Harborview Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress206-744-1600        
Washington State Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs 360-754-7583
King County Sexual Assault Resource Center425-226-5062
Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services 206-812-1001
Sexual Violence Law Center 206-832-3632

Trafficking Services

Organization for Prostitution Survivors 206-988-5463       
Real Escape from the Sex Trade206-451-7378
YouthCare
(commercially sexually exploited youth)
206-622-5555
YWCA E. Cherry Branch
(Adult survivors of sex trafficking)
206-568-7845
API Chaya
(Adult survivors of labor and/or sex trafficking)
206-325-0325
Refugee Women’s Alliance 206-721-0243
Washington Anti-Trafficking Response Network 206-245-0782

 


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