Search form

Donate Today

Unearth the 'Atomic Age' This July

Embark on a journey through time with KCTS 9’s 'Atomic Age'. Take the month of July and reflect on the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II with four programs loaded with content covering the dawn of the nuclear age.

Experience the story behind the most destructive invention in history with The Bomb, uncover the secrets of Uranium, fly out to Fukushima in NOVA: Nuclear Meltdown Disaster, and take a trip to Washington state’s nuclear site in Hanford. KCTS 9’s 'Atomic Age' begins at 10 p.m. on July 22, with Hanford.

BEWARE OF THE BOMB


Sit back as The Bomb takes you on an expedition through atomic history. Gear up to learn about the innovation that made possible the most destructive invention in human history. Work through the atomic bomb construction process and reacquaint yourself with physicists Albert Einstein and Robert Oppenheimer. Watch the premiere of The Bomb at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, July 28.

 

THE PROGRAM
Explore the atomic bomb, how it changed the world and how it continues to loom large in our lives. Witness its raw power and strangely compelling beauty with rare views of above-ground nuclear tests.

This groundbreaking film provides captivating insights through its masterfully restored footage and an assembly of voices who were there when the atomic age began.

 

FIND A HERO IN HANFORD

Hanford is back! KCTS 9 is getting local, covering Washington state’s nuclear legacy by reprising this award-winning historical documentary. Reflect upon the history of the nuclear site located only three hours from the city of Seattle. Tune in and watch Hanford at 10 p.m. on Wednesday, July 22

THE PROGRAM
In the spring of 1943, thousands of men and women arrived in a remote part of south-central Washington state. They knew little about why the U.S. Government had hired them, only that it was a Top Secret project to support the war effort.
In a race against time, workers began building a massive factory to produce plutonium for the nuclear weapon that ended World War II. It was one of the biggest gambles in American history and a project that changed the world forever. 

UNLOCK THE MYSTERIES OF URANIUM


Learn everything you wanted to know about uranium with this two-part program, Uranium: Twisting the Dragon’s Tail. Study alongside Dr. Derek Muller as he exposes uranium’s darkest secrets. Perhaps the most controversial of the elements, uranium continues to leave scientists puzzled. Dr. Muller will travel across five continents to follow this enthralling story. Uranium: Twisting the Dragon’s Tail premieres at 10 p.m. on July 28.


THE PROGRAM
Dr. Derek Muller embarks on a journey across the globe to explain the fascinating details of uranium’s birth and longevity. 

Born from the collapse of a star, uranium has brought hope, progress and destruction. It is an element that has profoundly shaped the past, will change the future and will exist long after humans have left the Earth. 

The two-part series of Uranium: Twisting the Dragon’s Tail premieres at 10 p.m. on July 28-29.

NOVA GETS NUCLEAR

NOVA tells the riveting story of the Fukushima nuclear crisis, including how the aftershock continues to leave the nuclear plant unsettled. Meet the actual workers and learn how the earthquake not only shook the plant, but the people as well. NOVA: Nuclear Meltdown Disaster premieres at 9 p.m. on Wednesday, July 29. 

THE PROGRAM
Four years after one of history’s worst nuclear accidents, NOVA reveals the minute-by-minute story of the Fukushima crisis and its ongoing aftermath, as told by the brave workers who stayed behind while an earthquake and tsunami crippled the nuclear plant.

Blog post authored by Nikki Torres Garcia, KCTS 9 Social Media Intern.

SUPPORTED BY

There are 0 comments

Read Comments Hide Comments

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <xmp><em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd></xmp>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
As a public media organization, KCTS 9 is committed to presenting a diversity of voices and perspectives through the stories we produce. We invite our readers to participate in an active and respectful discourse through our comments feature. All comments are moderated before posting to our website; if we deem a comment to be inappropriate and/or threatening, it will not be published.
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.