Undamming the Elwha - Historic Photos

Historic Photographs of the Elwha River Dams
  • Photo Galleries

Historic Photographs of the Elwha River dams

Click through the thumbnails below to view historic photographs of the Elwha River dams
(Courtesy of Library of Congress, Historic American Engineering Record)

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
04/13/12

Where will the Olympic Peninsula get its electricity from when this dam is deconstructed? A silly question but needs to be answered. Are people using less electricity or is Hanford going to be ramped up or a dam built somewhere else or will the power be bought from BC to the north? Up here we are going through the 3P's in which the public, private and provincial monies are used to build stuff sometimes whether we need it or not and if a place gets damaged the taxpayers are left having to fix it.

Canadian regulations aren't stong enough to protect our environment. Who ever is elected and gets the bag of cash can call the shots while they are still in office.

Thanks for all your wonderful programming.

04/13/12

Thanks for your question. The two power plants on the Elwha River generated 28 megawatts of power -- while that might sound like a lot, the amount of electricity is minimal compared to the region's needs. The dams provided power equal to about one half the energy needs of just one local paper company. That mill is now receiving all of its power from the City of Port Angeles via the regional electrical grid. But the paper company is currently developing plans to build a biomass plant to replace the power generated by the dams on the Elwha. Here are the details on those plans: http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20100808/NEWS/308089983/nippon...

04/17/12

Really nice footage, Katie. Look forward to meeting you some time.

Tim Tynan
Senior Fish Biologist
NOAA Fisheries Northwest Region

04/17/12

Thanks Tim! I sure enjoyed working with your colleagues at NOAA Fisheries. I look forward to meeting you too!

04/19/12

I grew up on the Olympic Peninsula and have always felt protective of its wild resources. Two jobs that mean much to me are: first, as a surveyor in 1967 for the Shelton Ranger District facilitating access to logging trucks. I took some pictures of silt and mud released just by the road-building and later by the logging right through the streams that, of course, would smother the smolt. Second, as an investigative assistant, three years later for Ralph Nader, I studied the Forest Service's policy of "Multiple Use".

I flew back to the Shelton Ranger district for Ralph Nader's Center for Study of Responsive Law to take pictures of what was, three years later, a stunningly degraded environment. The bulk of what I did study, however, was the Monongahela National Forest, because it was close to Washington D.C.

My team found similar degradation there destroying environmental integrity in the Appalachia just to the West of our Capital. The findings were published in Ralph's book, "The Last Stand".

Katie, your film makes me so happy. I am glad that the Klallam of the Lower Elwha were made stake-holders in this process. This is true healing. Your story-telling, here, is an important part of that healing process.

03/20/13

Hello,
Wonderful website! I love the pictures of the vintage switchboards with all the meters. I collect vintage watthour meters and actually have some of the ones pictured. One in particular that I saw in one of the pictures of a control room is the Westinghouse Type-OA Polyphase watthour meter. I just recently acquired one of those in very good condition. Thanks for the pictures!

Mike Jordan
San Antonio, Texas

07/17/13

Dams are mostly the common source of water supply and electricity. A lot of dams have been installed with turbines to convert the energy from flowing water into electricity. We at a electrician school in Texas once visited a dam to see how the conversion works.

08/12/13

Thanks for your question. The two power plants on the Elwha River generated 28 megawatts of power -- while that might sound like a lot, the amount of electricity is minimal compared to the region's needs. The dams provided power equal to about one half the energy needs of just one local paper company. That mill is now receiving all of its power from the City of Port Angeles via the regional electrical grid. vi nu
But the paper company is currently developing plans to build a biomass plat to

08/07/14
Really nice footage, Katie. Look forward to meeting you some time

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
  • KCTS9.org reserves the right to remove posts, at our discretion, which include inflammatory comments, comments that are off-topic, personal attacks or obscene language, or that are otherwise deemed objectionable.
  • By submitting your comment for publication on KCTS9.org, you agree to abide by our terms of service: http://kcts9.org/terms-conditions