Quantcast

Search form

Donate Today

The Reporter’s Notebook

The SPU Campus Shooting and Gun Culture Shock

Peter Choi shares his experience of losing his friend in the 2014 shooting and his disillusionment with American culture.

December 19, 2016

In this edition of Reporter’s Notebook, KCTS 9 intern Peter Choi talks about his recent personal essay about the Seattle Pacific University shooting and how the shooting shook his belief in America. Peter, an international student from South Korea, lost his close friend Paul Lee in the June 5, 2014 shooting. Lee was shot and killed by Aaron Ybarra, who opened fire on campus students. Ybarra was recently found guilty of premeditated first-degree murder and other charges related to the shooting. He had plead “not guilty by reason of insanity.” In this conversation with KCTS 9’s Enrique Cerna, Peter Choi talks about his friendship with Paul Lee and how writing the essay is helping him cope with his death, while giving him the chance to express his frustration with an American gun culture that he finds hard to understand.  



SUPPORTED BY

Enrique Cerna

The son of Mexican immigrants, Enrique Cerna was born and raised in the Yakima Valley.  Enrique joined KCTS 9 in January, 1995. He has anchored current affairs programs, moderated statewide political debates, produced and reported stories for national PBS programs in addition to local documentaries on social and juvenile justice, the environment and Latinos in Washington State.

Enrique has earned nine Northwest Emmy Awards and numerous other honors. In June, 2013, he was inducted into the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Northwest Chapter’s Silver Circle for his work as a television professional.

More stories by Enrique Cerna

There are 1 comments

Read Comments Hide Comments

<p>Surely we can work a news story about a very recent UW Seattle campus shooting into the busy news schedule somewhere?</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>It seems that violence is not reported when perpetrated by Leftists.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Is there any credible count of Leftist hate crimes in response to the campaign and election of President Trump?</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>We had multiple violent hate crimes here at UW Seattle on 20 January at a political talk scheduled and reserved properly to take place within an enclosed auditorium at UW. &nbsp;Violent Leftists beat attendees and stripped them of political paraphenalia. &nbsp;One violent speech breakerr was shot in self defense by a skinny little Asian guy that he was stomping into the pavement. &nbsp;The Seattle PD questioned and released the shooter who received treatment for his injuries. &nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>In a comedic undertone it seems the skinny little Asian dude has a passionate gay crush on this Milo fellow who is undeniably handsome and describes his own hair as "Perfect". &nbsp;It is nice [Milo's hair] and he certainly has plenty of it. &nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Paint and bricks were thrown at attendees and even at Police, by violent Leftists.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Violent Leftists tried very hard and in many cases succesfully to physically bar the entrance and passage of attendees into the conference. &nbsp;A high school boy was dragged into a crowd, beaten, painted blue, and stripped of his Trump paraphenalia right in front of his helpless dad, beaten likewise by same Leftists. &nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>It would seem that Southern Poverty Law counts hate crimes unilaterally, as KCTS reports hate crimes unilaterally. &nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Why is the anti-Milo campus violence of the Left not being reported?</p>

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <xmp><em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd></xmp>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
As a public media organization, KCTS 9 is committed to presenting a diversity of voices and perspectives through the stories we produce. We invite our readers to participate in an active and respectful discourse through our comments feature. All comments are moderated before posting to our website; if we deem a comment to be inappropriate and/or threatening, it will not be published.