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In his glory days at Emerald Downs, Bucky B. Lucky had three wins and six second or third place finishes, earning more than $20,000.
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Rescued from slaughter, Bucky B Lucky is recovering at SAFE, Save A Forgotten Equine, which provides abandoned horses with vet care, nutrition and training to prepare them for adoption. Last year they placed six horses in new homes.
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At SAFE, Save A Forgotten Equine, Bucky B Lucky is learning to be a horse again, and happy to be away from the auction environment.
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Bucky B Lucky is one of 15 horses at SAFE, Save A Forgotten Equine, that can be adopted. Rescuers think he would be suitable as a trail horse, or for an intermediate rider.
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Most race horses in North America are required to have a lip tattoo for identification. Bucky B Lucky's tattoo helped horse rescuers discover that he is the grandson of Seattle Slew.
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Portland Meadows has enacted a no-slaughter policy for racehorses, though Emerald Downs (seen here) has not. ED track managers question whether such a policy could be legally enforced.
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The Enumclaw Sales Pavilion sells horses to the highest bidder. Some go to new homes, but if they can't get a high enough bid, the horses are sold for slaughter in Canada or Mexico.
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Ron Mariotti, owner of the Enumclaw Sales Pavilion, believes horse slaughter should be legalized in the U.S. again. The last horse slaughterhouse in the U.S. closed in 2007.
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In the bad economy, many horse owners can no longer afford to keep them, which means more horses are ending up destined for slaughter.
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