Nora Ephron episode hero
  • CONVERSATIONS AT KCTS 9

Nora Ephron

Writer, director, journalist, and author Nora Ephron died in June 2012, leaving a legacy of critically-acclaimed books, screenplays, poetry, and films. Last year, Ephron visited our studios, where she talked about making "Sleepless in Seattle," her other films and books, and her take on aging gracefully.

About the Episode

Writer, director, journalist, and author Nora Ephron died June 26, 2012 of complications from leukemia at the age of 71. She leaves behind a legacy of critically-acclaimed work, including some of Hollywood's most memorable films. Ephron had a special connection with Seattle, forged when she wrote and directed "Sleepless in Seattle" in 1993. In 2011, Ephron visited our studios for an episode of Conversations at KCTS 9, where she talked about making "Sleepless in Seattle," her other films and books, and her take on aging gracefully.

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About Nora Ephron

Nora Ephron was a film director, producer, screenwriter, novelist, journalist, author, and blogger. She was best known for her romantic comedies and especially her screenplays for "When Harry Met Sally" and "Sleepless in Seattle." Her most recent film is "Julie & Julia."

Remembering Nora Ephron

"I was stunned when I heard that Nora Ephron had died. I didn't know she was ill. In April, I interviewed her sister Delia, also a writer, author, playwright, and screenwriter, who collaborated with her sister on "Sleepless in Seattle" and other movies. We talked about her latest book "The Lion is In" and she talked about how well she and Nora worked together. Recently, they had a successful Broadway play "Love, Loss and What I Wore" that was on a national tour. She said that all of the Ephron girls (there are four) were destined to be writers because their parents were Hollywood writers. All became successful authors.

I interviewed Nora last year when she was promoting her book "I Remember Nothing" in which she talked about aging, divorce, blogging, failure and success, and her alcoholic parents. The book was at times serious but full of humor. That was Nora Ephron. Other than wanting a make-up person, she didn't seem to take herself too seriously. She was genuine. She could be serious about the difficulties she had faced in her life but also funny in the way she laughed at it all. That's probably why she was such a great writer and filmmaker.

She was also a great interview. I hope you'll take the time to watch this episode of Conversations. I'm glad I had the opportunity to meet and talk with her. She made me laugh... a lot... and these days we need the opportunity to laugh out loud... a lot. Nora Ephron made that happen for millions of people. Thanks Nora."

— Enrique Cerna, Executive Producer and Host of Conversations at KCTS 9

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